Parking Permits  
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Enforce parking policies effectively

 
parking policy
When it comes to parking compliance, expect the best but plan for the worst.
Like hall monitors and IRS auditors, parking attendants have a tough and thankless job. Through decades of conditioning, people have been trained to feel entitled to free parking – despite land and maintenance costs, the price of surveillance, insurance and upkeep. Since drivers need clear boundaries in order to respect parking facilities, it’s a good idea to have a definitive parking policy before you open your gates. As you create your own system, be sure to consider the following categories to help ensure your regulations are comprehensive.
  Who will enforce your parking policy? The only thing worse than no policy at all is one that doesn't have the manpower behind it to ensure its evenly applied. And if you will have workers like security guards splitting time between inspecting vehicles for permits and other duties, make sure they shake up their schedule every day – if people begin to notice that the guard checks permits every day at 2pm, illegal parkers will find ways around your guidelines!
  Make sure signage is prominent and in several languages if necessary. You don't want violators to use ignorance as an excuse. When formulating your policy, seek legal advice to make sure that any penalties you create are enforceable but also enough of a deterrent to get potential rulebreakers' attention. Think about how drivers will find out about your parking policy. If their first encounter is with an attendant giving them a ticket or having their car towed, you've missed an opportunity!
  Your parking policy shouldn't be about punition, but centered on concrete goals. Are you trying to make sure that cars are evenly distributed around your lot?
  Trying to reduce your employees' carbon emissions? In addition to issuing permits, think about subsidizing bicycles or public transport passes. Trying to ensure security and adequate maintenance? You may also want to consider a fence.
  Are you considering all the cost effective options? Consider, for example, price parking—charging less or more depending on the desirability of the spaces—which allows your customers to decide on the value of their own parking needs. You can also encourage people to use different means of transportation that are cheaper and more eco-friendly, like biking, walking, or taking public transit. Shared parking or unbundled parking are options that, in many situations, could be a boon to both you and your customers.
  Is your parking policy fair? Nothing will drive away customers faster than a business’s unsavory reputation. Make sure you’re offering exactly what you’re advertising; don’t promise free parking if there are hidden caveats, or force people to pay for parking that they do not use.